Social Media Engagement – Creative Practice

I have shared the work across social media.

Behance – https://www.behance.net/gallery/59566361/Argos-Toy-Advertising-Student-Brief 

7 Views

Dribbble – https://dribbble.com/shots/4057109-Argos-Toy-Advertising-Campaign-Student-Project

183 Views, 32 Likes

Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.com/love2print/my-graphic-design-portfolio/

Unknown Number of Views

Student Show – http://www.studentshow.com/gallery/59566361/Argos-Toy-Advertising-Student-Brief

7 Views

Twitter – https://twitter.com/Ayshea_Siddall/status/938149030290477056

1 Re-tweet, 2 Likes, 83 Impressions

Feedback – Creative Practice Outcomes

Paul felt my illustration style was fuzzy and not clean like the below:

Image result for vector infographic

Related image

I can understand how professional illustrators, even ones creating a more relaxed style of illustration, would create cleaner lines than the ones I have created. If the Argos advert was a real campaign, then a professional illustrator would be used. However, I do believe my simple relaxed style would still appeal to children.

Challenging Stereotypes

Hollywood has been challenging some of the gender stereotypes through remakes and promoting strong female leads. For example Ghostbusters (2016).

Ghostbusters 2016

The recent Star Wars Film, The Last Jedi has a strong female lead in the name of Rey.

The Last Jedi

There is also the upcoming remake of Ocean’s Eleven with a female cast.

Some people have been unhappy in what they perceive to be casting females just appeal to the left wing, feminists, etc. For example casting a female to play the Doctor in the Doctor Who series (https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/doctor-who-steven-moffat-jodie-whittaker-backlash-comic-con-2017-1023733).

Illustration Research

Al Murphy created these brilliant illustrations for one of my sons favourite books, Kitchen Disco: http://www.al-murphy.com/

Axel Scheffer has illustrated some of the most popular childrens books.

I wanted my own illustrations to be hand-drawn as I feel the simplistic style of the illustrations would attract children and the bold colours would attract both children and parents.

Nick Sharratt, who has also worked with Julia Donaldson to some very bold and bright illustrations.parade of characters

Hippo in a Hat

Image result for hippo has a hat

Quentin Blake has a very fluid, relaxed illustration style. And has created illustrations for many children’s books such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, The BFG, The Twits, and Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots, amongst others.

Image result for quentin blake illustrations

Image result for quentin blake illustrations

Notes and Sketches – Toy Advertising Ideas

Initial sketches/notes/experimental designs and notes for gender reversal/gender neutral advertising.

Feedback about the above design that it wasn’t different enough, seen as normal for girls to ride bikes. The slogan needs to be associated more with the opposite gender for it to stand out but the boy/toy washing advert received positive feedback as it challenged gender stereotypes.

Reflecting on Photo Choices

I have had to search hard for suitable images. Girls playing with “boys” toys is a lot easier to find than boys playing with “girls” toys.  I need to find the right images, images big enough and work with a phrase. Therefore not all ideas have come in to fruition.

One of the images was of a boy looking into a washing machine. It wasn’t working in its current form so I drew a vector washing machine. This added a more fun, child-friendly feel and consistent with the other adverts.

The path puzzles are to be printed in magazines so they are more subtle. 3 toys will be used in the ads – one gender neutral, one non-stereotypical and one stereotypical. No toy is wrong, a boy can play with a boys toy and a girls. No saying one is right or wrong.

Typefaces Research – How Children Read

This webpage, https://www.fonts.com/content/learning/fyti/situational-typography/typography-for-children, provides useful insight into how young children read words.

What I learned from this page:

  • Don’t put too much text on a page
  • Ensure good contrast levels between text and background
  • Don’t use condensed or expanded typefaces – make it harder to read
  • Don’t use anything too stylised, except for headers “Headline or title type gives you the opportunity to be more playful in style, color and layout, since there are fewer words to read. Decorated typestyles, lots of color, and curved and jumping baselines can all be used to attract and entertain the young reader. Keeping it light and fun is the key to keeping a young reader interested and turning pages.”

Another page with useful information: https://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2011/06/effective-use-of-typography-in-applications-for-children-3.php

“..it is advisable to stay away from distorted, decorative, or cursive letterforms. Some fonts that offer optimized legibility, because they were designed specifically for kids, include the Sasoon font family and Gill Sans Schoolbook.

Also: http://www.creativebloq.com/inspiration/these-10-fonts-for-kids-will-keep-you-young-at-heart

Marketing Techniques – Research

While all ages recognised adverts on TV as adverts, only the older children recognised display advertising as such. The defining characteristic as to whether adverts were considered as such is how much they interrupt the other things that they are doing – TV adverts interrupt the show they are watching, pop-ups do the same; banner ads don’t interrupt and can be passively ignored.

And in all cases the children had developed their own patterns for skipping this advertising as soon as possible – ignoring it, looking over it. When confronted with in-game advertising, for example, the children would leave their phone and mute and go and do something else while the adverts played out. They knew they were coming and had strategies to avoid them.

http://www.enginegroup.com/blogs/2016-2-16

Interesting how younger children don’t recognise display advertising as advertising. And once children do recognise advertising they learn how to skip it – the advertising needs to engage children so that don’t skip past it.

I want to engage children and I thought about basing an advert on path puzzles as pictured here:

 

Path Puzzle

 

These adverts could feature inside Children’s magazines but also magazines/papers that parents read.

Other Research:

https://mediasmarts.ca/sites/mediasmarts/files/lesson-plans/lesson_online_marketing_kids_strategies_techniques.pdf

https://www.bizjournals.com/bizjournals/how-to/marketing/2016/04/how-to-develop-digital-advertising-strategies-for.html

http://mediasmarts.ca/digital-media-literacy/media-issues/marketing-consumerism/how-marketers-target-kids

Toys will be Toys

Few shots I took on the theme of switching stereotypes.

Eyes on the Prize

Digging

Lost the focus on the Pony one but it was low light so a bit trickier. Don’t think I have the technical skills currently for low light/night photography – need to more practice.

Pony Construction

Lads Washing

Action Man

In the Name of Glitter

Getting Dressed

Research toy photography:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/may/28/toys-kids-girls-boys-childhood-development-gender-research#img-1
http://img.sparknotes.com/content/sparklife/sparktalk/girlboyswedes_LargeWide.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/digital-photography-school.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/toyphoto1.jpg?resize=600%2C400&ssl=1
https://cdn.trendhunterstatic.com/thumbs/legography.jpeg
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Tq9PF9GQal8/Vgl4BjQPsxI/AAAAAAAAMh0/VKsRNCdXlt4/s1600/Toy%2BPhotography%2BMitchel%2BWu_0181.jpg