Junior Graphic Design Job Market Sheffield

Before going onto a PGCE I plan to return to work part-time as I have two small children. From what I have read on the internet a PGCE is very intensive and I don’t think it would be right to go straight onto a PGCE with two young children.

LINKS: https://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2011/sep/14/pgce-tips-teaching-resources

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=900754

https://community.tes.com/threads/what-makes-the-pgce-so-hard-for-everyone.412249/

Today I have taken a look at the job market today in regards to Graphic Design jobs.

First job that pops up is paying £19k-£21k and 2 years general Graphic Design experience is required and ideally experience with sign-making using a flatbed cutter or CNC router.

A middle weight position with a minimum of 5 years experience paying £20-£25k.

Another employer is wanting a 3+ years experience with a strong web portfolio, no salary mentioned.

Graphic Web Developer, £20k a year but must understand web development.

Graphic Design Assistant paying £18-20k, minimum 1 year of experience required.

Digital Designer/Graphic Designer position, experienced required and knowledge of web development.

My search today did not find any Junior Graphic Design positions full or part-time positions. All the positions above are full-time. What I have learnt is that there is a strong emphasis on web design and development – these two areas have converged over the years into 1 multi-disciplined job rather than two separate jobs in many cases. A Graphic Designer today is not only expected to be able to confidently use InDesign and Illustrator they are required to, at the very least, to be competent basic knowledge of web development – in some cases more than basic knowledge. Graphic Design is converging with Digital Media/Web Development and in the Digital Age this is not likely to change.

“For graphic designers, a career move into digital design makes sense. The shift to online platforms for almost all traditional media means skilled designers with an eye for the digital are in high demand”  – https://digitalskillsacademy.com/blog/why-digital-design-is-the-best-next-career-step-for-graphic-designers

“Learning to code websites will mean that you have a “future proof” skill. In terms of the foreseeable future, the internet and online marketing are not going away. The time that you invest in learning this new skill will put you in a position to produce work that is highly valued by employers and potential clients.” – https://creativepro.com/graphic-designers-need-learn-coding-competitive/

Also understanding how things work can help you create better designs, everything has it’s limit and understanding how websites work helps you not disappoint a client by promising something which can’t be delivered or is outside the client’s budget.

“Also, quite simply, you will be a better designer if you have a basic understanding of how the development process works, why certain programming languages are used, and how they restrict or expand your ability to design your intentions. When you have a better sense of what’s technically realistic before you start designing, you’ll be less likely to waste your time and more likely to focus your energy focusing on the parts of your site that aren’t up to the whims of the developer’s implementation.” – https://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2015/04/should-designers-learn-to-code/

Being able to design and code makes you more attractive to employers and probably more likely to land you a job.

“Those developers/designers who have a good grasp of skills across both sides of the spectrum are highly sought after in the industry.” – https://www.upwork.com/hiring/development/web-design-vs-web-development/

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